Clean Thinking

What is your definition of clean? What people think of as "clean enough" in their home is staggeringly different. Hopefully, your definition for your converting operation is the same as that of your customers.

Detecting the Edge

Web guides have evolved dramatically since their first appearance on converting lines in the 1930s. Electronic edge detectors and electric motors gradually displaced pneumatics and hydraulics as demand grew for greater accuracy and reliability, and tolerance for leaky hydraulics diminished. The earliest electronic systems were far from perfect—in particular the edge detectors were sensitive to dust and temperature swings—but they were a big improvement over their predecessors

Get Out of the Scroll Business

Curl will kill your product. How do webs end up curly? Let’s go over the top causes and consider how to eliminate them.

Why Tension?

Why is tensioning such a crucial first step? What are the benefits of a well-tensioned web? What is the right amount of tension for your product? Don’t slack off now...keep reading for these answers and more.

Who Likes Film?

Customers like films because they are cool. Films can be clear, thin, shiny, clean, and elastic. Product designers like films because they are functional. Films can improve a product’s break strength, tear resistance, and gas barrier performance. Process people like films because…wait. Do process people like films?

Web Tension 101

Typically, tension is measured in PLI (pounds per linear inch) in the US. If you know PLI and you want to know total tension applied to the web, multiply PLI times the width of the material in inches. If you know total pounds of tension applied to the web and you want to know PLI, divide the total pounds of tension across the web by the width of the web in inches.

The Harms of Harmony

From a simple handling viewpoint, these harmonic motion hiccups may be no problem, but combined with coating, extrusion, slitting, or winding operations, they may lead to waste.

Mechanics of Tension Control, Part II

For this basic tutorial in the mechanics of web tension control, tension is defined as the force applied to a continuous web of material in the machine direction.

Slitting Debris: Cracking the Case

Dust and debris are a common but unwanted side product of slitting. Slitting debris comprises the small particles that break off a product's edge during the slitting process. It is created through fracture and abrasion. Uncontrolled slitting debris will lead to defects in your customer's product and equipment downtime.

10 Tips on Antiwrinkle Rollers

Antiwrinkle rollers, like antiperspirants and anti-inflammatories, have a name that implies a cure to your problem. But as with most remedies, read the

Can This Lamination Be Saved?

Delaminating undesired separation within a multilayer product is a major problem for many converters. Laminate products are a marriage of two or more

The Signs of Shear Wrinkle

Your web is talking to you. Not out loud but in a form of sign language. It's saying, Oh, I'm shifting to the right (or left) in this span, or Ouch, I'm

The Word on Winding

Winders may not cost six million dollars, but like that 1970s television phenomenon, The Six Million Dollar Man, we have the technology to build them better, stronger, and faster.

Steering Directions Made Simple

Steering and displacement guides are the two most popular forms of intermediate guiding.

Tracking Wrinkles: Part II

The easiest way to explain roller diameter variation tracking is to walk you through the chain of events. Diameter variations create web strain variations.

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